Promoting an Anonymous Reporting Program: Building Awareness

Bayless School District superintendent Ron Tucker posts a sticker on one of his district's school buses to promote the CyberBully Hotline program to students.

Bayless School District superintendent Ron Tucker posts a sticker on one of his district's school buses to promote the CyberBully Hotline program to students.

Promotion is one of the most important aspects of implementation when it comes to anonymous reporting programs. Schools must continually make sure that students and parents know about their program. Two important methods of accomplishing this goal are to use awareness materials in the places where students might experience bullying and to use kickoff meetings to introduce the program.

Awareness materials are essential in helping people understand, remember, and utilize an anonymous reporting program. Since we introduced the CyberBully Hotline program, we’ve provided schools with customized promotional posters to use in high-traffic areas of a school, wallet cards, and more. We also partner with schools to provide them with other awareness materials that they may need.

Our partnership with the Bayless School District in St. Louis is a perfect example of how we’ve worked with a school district to create new awareness materials. As we wrote about in our Hardin, TX and Wentzville, MO case studies, the CyberBully Hotline has been successfully used by several schools to address school bus bullying. Our friends at the Bayless School District were aware that bullying could happen on the bus and wanted on-bus materials to promote the CyberBully Hotline program. To help them, we created some customized stickers that could be posted on the interior of each bus.

As you can see in the picture, Bayless superintendent Ron Tucker decided to post stickers in the middle of each bus, where they could be easily seen by students.

Mr. Tucker told us that parents want to know that school leaders are doing something to address bullying. “Parents like the fact that we’re making it easy for their kids to report things,” Mr. Tucker said of the CyberBully Hotline.

Another important part of building awareness is to use kickoff meetings to introduce the program. Good kickoff meetings give parents and students all the details about how an anonymous program works and encourages both to make reports about any concern.

Again, our friends at the Bayless School District are thought leaders in this regard. Mr. Tucker told us that his district was about to launch an Olweus program to assist with bullying prevention. To let parents know about both the Olweus program and the CyberBully Hotline program, the district invited parents to attend a kickoff meeting to introduce both.

Considering that the CyberBully Hotline program integrates well with bullying prevention programs like Olweus, introducing both programs in the same kickoff meeting was a good decision.

Besides awareness materials and kickoff meetings, there are many ways to promote an anonymous reporting program. Our free upcoming webinar on implementing anonymous reporting programs is designed to provide school administrators with best practice guidelines on how to install, promote, and manage an anonymous reporting program. Click here to register for your free seat.

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